Back Support

Our back aptly described, is the large posterior which stretches from the top of our buttocks to the base of our neck. The back provides support for our head and the trunk of our body. The upper back which has more structural support is less flexible than the lower back. The central feature of our back is our spine, or more appropriately put, our vertebral column. At the top of this complex multiple-bone structure is the thoracic vertebrae and at the bottom, the lumbar vertebrae. The spinal cord with its central nervous system is housed in the spinal canal. In between the vertebrae, there are the cartilaginous spinal discs. Our spine is by any measure, the most important bone in our entire body. Other major bone structures in our back include the scapula or shoulder blades and the ribcage that extends from the spine to our chest.

There are several main muscles in our back. The intertransversarii muscle allows for movement between individual vertebrae and the multifidus spinae allow for movement for the whole spine. There is also the thoracolumbar fascia closer to the lower spine. The trapezius muscle runs between the neck and the anterior chain for the shoulders. The large latissimus dorsi runs from the shoulders to the hips. There are also the teres minor and teres major muscles by the shoulder blades. Besides these, there are the other smaller muscles at the side of the abdomen which are part of the abdominal muscles.

How does injury happens?

The back supports the body’s vertical posture and keeps the upper body balanced and cushioned from ground impact. Incorrect distribution of force over time can cause serious injury to the body. The lumbar is formed by five centrums intervertebral discs, back muscles and abdominal muscles all helping to maintain the balance and weight transfer required by the upper body’s movements. Excessive turning during exercise, a direct collision of poor flexibility due to muscle fatigue can all cause a sprain of the back muscle group. Weakness or excessive loading or weakness of the abdominal muscles can also produce problems like protrusion of intervertebral discs and degeneration of the centrum; and also dislocation leading to pressure on the nerves that causes back problems like sciatica. Without proper therapy, such injuries may turn into a chronic problem such as persistent lower back pains.

The shoulders and spine are easily injured in hyper-extension. Repetitive rotating shoulder motions from overhead to rest position often causes rotary cuff injury which often results from exercises involving throw-and-cast. The spine tends to be injured when moving in a wide range with acceleration or in a pressed condition. The most common injury to the spine is low back pain (LBP). About 60-80% of people suffer from at least one episode of LBP during their life. LBP is a complex syndrome caused by muscle strain, ligament tear or disc-related problems.

How does LP protect you?

Like the steel under-structure of a modern building, the spine supports the weight of the upper body. That’s why the LP Sports Medicine Team focuses on the support function of the back using strong metal support discs or plastic-steel elastic discs that allow the back protector to substantially reduce the load on the spine. Appropriate elastic binding tape can help the back maintain optimal position that puts the smallest load on the lumbar. It reduces incorrect weight transfer due to muscle stiffness and spine loading caused by long-term poor posture. After an injury a well-designed back protector can limit a range of movement for the entire lumbar and muscles, decreasing the load on the injured area during the recovery period. All other LP back support ranges provide similar functions. LP Back Support is categorised into the Prevention Stage, Acute Stage, Subacute Stage and Chronic Stage lines.

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