Ankle Support

The ankle is truly complex and it sustains great pressures.There are two joints known as the subtalar joint and the true ankle joint in our ankle. The subtalar joint consists of the talus and calcaneus bones which control side to side motion of the foot while the true ankle joint has 3 bones, namely - the tibia, fibula and talus. These take care of the up and down movement. The ends of the joint bones are covered by the articular cartilage and the major ligaments of the ankle are called the anterior tibiofibular, lateral collateral and deltoid. Together, they provide lateral and medial stability.

read more

The Achilles tendon is found at the back of the ankle and links to the heel. These components together with the muscles and other tendons work in synchrony to handle load stress when you walk, run and jump as well as a host of other related activities. They cushion impact and transfer load stress. For most of us, the ankles are perhaps the most frequently used part of our body.

How does ankle injury happen?

Rapid acceleration-deceleration and forced movements can cause severe strains of the ankle tendons and the fascia. After an injury and if there is not enough time for recovery or protection, the stability of the ankle is weakened. It can even develop into a chronic sprain. The ankle joint is at the fibia, tibular and talar bone with the complex structure of the medial and lateral ligaments jointly provide stability.

During exercise, sudden impact, falling from a height or even when stepping on someone else’s foot and upon uneven surface can all destabilise a joint. This is due to strain of the ankle’s anterior talofibula ligament. Without proper recovery, it can progress into becoming a chronic sprain. On the other hand, uncoordinated or forced athletic movements can cause fascia and tendon fatigue due to repeated and excessive stretching. This may result in inflammation of the Achilles tendon and plantar fasclitis.

High-impact or repetitive motions are the causes of ankle injuries. Running and jumping on rough surfaces may also easily lead to ankle injuries from counterforce stress. Therefore, athletes should concentrate on their movements and the environment during exercise to prevent ankle injury. Achilles tendonitis is a common form of tendon injury. It is an overuse injury caused by repetitive motion or high-impact sports. Pain will be aggravated at the posterior of heel during exercise and will ease at rest. Lateral ligament ankle sprain usually occurs when landing on the lateral board of the foot with the ankle overturned such as varus or valgus. Swelling and pain result from torn ligaments.

How does LP Ankle Support protect you?

The ankle guides the performance of the body’s most basic movements and exercises. It is the most crucial body part for cushioning the body’s weight from impact with the ground. Based on the characteristics of the ankle’s structure during the performance of different activities, the LP Sports Medicine Team wraps the joint with strength binding tape. Its interlocking configuration can raise overall stability and cushioning the ligaments from strains caused by excessive stretching. Other ranges of LP ankle supports also act in similar ways. Technological advancements like the pressurization of cushions and patented stretchable CoolPrene material help strengthen the ankle support capabilities. CoolPrene ventilates. In addition to preventing injuries, these special materials can also enhance athletic performance. After an injury LP Ankle Supports can restrict the movement of the ankles – thus reducing the load on an injured area during recovery.

LP SUPPORT ankle braces emphasize stability and sound support. Using the counter force on the right and left sides, the braces increase the stability of the ankle. They not only reduce the possibility of ankle sprains, but also increase support with the spring design. The range of LP Ankle Support presented here complements the most crucial needs and preferences of athletes of most sports and exercise. Specific use and function are presented as Protective Stage, Acute Stage, Subacute Stage and Chronic Stage.


Items 1 to 9 of 16 total

per page
Set Descending Direction
Page:
  1. 1
  2. 2

Items 1 to 9 of 16 total

per page
Set Descending Direction
Page:
  1. 1
  2. 2